Point Counter-Point: Should communters go through rain, sleet, snow, and hail to get to campus?

Suck It Up

Commuters, Driving, Winter, Snow
Since classes are important, commuter students should be coming to their classes regardless of weather conditions if the campus remains open.

Carroll’s procedures for canceling classes, just like any other school, examine potential safety risks to commuter students. If they think conditions warrant it, they cancel classes. If not, they don’t.

Students can argue all they want that conditions are not safe and that the school can’t know if it is safe where they are, but what this ultimately boils down to is that students just want to skip class anyway. Once the possibility of a snow day sets in, students tend to do anything they can to make sure they get it.

It’s true that sometimes the school is wrong. Conditions aren’t safe. But the fact of the matter is: Tuition is $25,000. That’s a lot of money being invested in classes. To skip class is wasting that money. A slow, careful drive is going to be worth not wasting cash and potential knowledge.

Professors often have long commutes as well, but they make the trips because they have an obligation to students to be there. If those students just decide class isn’t worth the trip, the professor has wasted time and driven through bad weather on their own.

Typically, it’s even worse. It might be a parent spending money on tuition or future loans that will only continue to grow. Skipping classes for any reason quickly becomes a bad social or financial decision.

A trip through bad weather certainly isn’t fun, but, in the long run, it’s not going to be the worst thing in the world. And if it that big of a deal, start living in the dorm.

Tears freezing on my cheek. Snow creeping its way into my boot. My fingers almost instantly losing all feeling and I’ve barely begun my day. Nobody absolutely needs to go to class when a snow day should be called. Commuters, in particular do not need to go to class when snow days should be called.

I can understand that class time is valuable. One missed day can easily derail rest of the syllabus. I can especially understand how classes may continue amidst the blizzard because many students live a block or two away (never mind the professors who have to drive in). First-year students are typically placed in dormitory halls. Transfer or upperclassman students are typically placed in houses, suite-style halls, or apartments. Juniors and younger are, after all, required to stay on campus.

That being said, Carroll still has commuter residents who aren’t fully recognized on campus. When school is not cancelled, commuters still need to shovel their driveways and hit the slippery roads with other careless drivers. One syllabus-saving-school-day is not worth the danger a driver faces in inclement weather. Each year, between 700 and 800 people are killed in traffic accidents in Wisconsin. Poor weather conditions, such as snow, rain, wind, and fog, were present during 100 fatal Wisconsin car accidents.

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation has a list of suggestions for winter driving (though, I should point out that they recommend NOT driving in bad conditions) but even these tips can’t always apply to the commuter. They suggest not traveling alone – two to three per vehicle and travel in convoy with another vehicle.  Other obvious tips include driving carefully and defensively or watching for ice patches on bridges and overpasses, for those of you poor souls who happen to be driving this week.

In conclusion, commuters, forget about your lecture and stay home with a cup of cocoa and a nice magazine  – stay where it’s safe.

Stay at Home

Tears freezing on my cheek. Snow creeping its way into my boot. My fingers almost instantly losing all feeling and I’ve barely begun my day. Nobody absolutely needs to go to class when a snow day should be called. Commuters, in particular do not need to go to class when snow days should be called.

I can understand that class time is valuable. One missed day can easily derail rest of the syllabus. I can especially understand how classes may continue amidst the blizzard because many students live a block or two away (never mind the professors who have to drive in). First-year students are typically placed in dormitory halls. Transfer or upperclassman students are typically placed in houses, suite-style halls, or apartments. Juniors and younger are, after all, required to stay on campus.

That being said, Carroll still has commuter residents who aren’t fully recognized on campus. When school is not cancelled, commuters still need to shovel their driveways and hit the slippery roads with other careless drivers. One syllabus-saving-school-day is not worth the danger a driver faces in inclement weather. Each year, between 700 and 800 people are killed in traffic accidents in Wisconsin. Poor weather conditions, such as snow, rain, wind, and fog, were present during 100 fatal Wisconsin car accidents.

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation has a list of suggestions for winter driving (though, I should point out that they recommend NOT driving in bad conditions) but even these tips can’t always apply to the commuter. They suggest not traveling alone – two to three per vehicle and travel in convoy with another vehicle.  Other obvious tips include driving carefully and defensively or watching for ice patches on bridges and overpasses, for those of you poor souls who happen to be driving this week.

In conclusion, commuters, forget about your lecture and stay home with a cup of cocoa and a nice magazine  – stay where it’s safe.

Author: admin

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